Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Independent Survey Suggests That People Feel Powerless Over Their Lives



Edward Brown, M.S.


In a recent survey conducted by Core Edge Image & Charisma Institute, forty-eight percent of respondents said that they would invest their hard-earned money on information that provided them more power and influence. In a similar survey geared to the law enforcement community, twenty-two percent of police personnel when asked what bothered them most said that they felt powerless.  The area where respondents felt the greatest need was earning more money.


Edward Brown, founder of Core Edge Private Label Rights (a subsidiary of Core Edge Image & Charisma Institute) provides questions and answers to the implications of this current study.


Q: How was this study taken?


Brown: We used the online survey tool, Survey Monkey, to gather our data. Essentially, we wanted to know what type of information respondents would like to see more of as we expand our informational products line.


Q: Were there any surprises?


Brown: It was surprising that some police personnel felt powerless over their lives. Police officers carry a great deal of power in society and to hear them say they felt powerless was shocking.


Q: You have a law enforcement background. What do you think they meant?


Brown: I would think that their positional power has no automatic benefit to their personal well-being. Yes, they carry a lot of power, but they still have car notes, house mortgages, childcare expenses, etc. At the end of the day, there may be a connection between one’s life choices and one’s happiness. Also, there may be a disconnection between what society expects of the police versus what they expect from themselves. In this vein, the police are expected to maintain control over society as well as maintain control over their personal lives. 


Q: There were two independent surveys done. What did the other survey results show?


Brown: The other survey was geared to individuals within different companies. The desire for power and influence was high, but the percentages of powerlessness (11.54%) were not as high as law enforcement. Interestingly, both sectors discussed the desire for more money and believed their greatest concern was lacking money. So, going back to powerlessness, the less money you feel you have, the less powerful you feel.


Q: How does this bode for research suggesting that recognition and rewards are more important than money?


Brown: Well, recognition and rewards may be important once money is no longer an issue. The analogy that comes to mind is that of the movie industry.  Once actors become movie stars and are financially independent, they no longer take movie roles to merely stay afloat. They begin taking movie roles that are self-fulfilling and will gain the respect of their colleagues within the movie industry. That’s why the Oscar Awards are so important to them.


Q: What tools can be developed to respond to the needs that came out of the surveys?


Brown: If money, power and influence were seen as ideal aspirations for gaining happiness, it is only wise to create “How to…” products that help facilitate these needs. It all depends on what individuals are doing daily with the material to invest in themselves. These tools can help, but it requires a concerted effort to change their mindset, lifestyle and professional skills to create a happier life. A shift in choices very well means a shift in fortune.




Edward Brown, M.S., is a content marketer and researcher for Core Edge Police Pro (a subsidiary of Core Edge Image & Charisma Institute, Inc.), which develops web copy and digital products for law enforcement agencies.


He has advanced legal training from the University of Dayton School of Law and a master’s degree from Mercer University in Public Safety Leadership.


Ed is the author of over 30 books including: Police Leadership: The Morale Driven Police Department and The A-Team: How to Be a Top Police Department in Recruiting, Training and Retaining Employees available at Amazon Kindle.



For more information, visit: http://plr.coreedgeprivatelabelrights.com

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Information Product Company Carves Out a Small Niche Within an Amazon Universe








For immediate release:                                                                                     

October 7, 2014

12:00PM (EST)





Atlanta, GA—October 7, 2014---How do you compete with the online vastness of Amazon and the specialness of Apple products? Well, one company believes it has the answer. Core Edge Private Label Rights (a subsidiary of Core Edge Image & Charisma Institute) recently developed a website where visitors can purchase articles, digital books and videos to specifically teach them how to gain more power and influence. Core Edge competes against online alternatives by turning the best practices of charismatic leaders into tangible products. According to findings in the 2013 Mobile Path-to-Purchase study by Telmetrics and xAd, forty-six percent of consumers are using mobile devices to search for information online. Core Edge is using this trend to bundle specialty products for introverts, businesspeople and law enforcement officials seeking an edge in their interpersonal relationship skills.


Core Edge Private Label Rights founder, Edward Brown, says, “We looked at the best practices of Amazon, Apple and Microsoft and determined that specialty products that showed consumers how to fulfill a core need could be a force to be reckoned with. We decided to focus on people’s need for power and influence. Where many soft skills training companies offer services, we saw an opportunity to package soft skills within educational products.  We believe that small companies can compete more effectively against giant corporations by expanding its product line within a specialty niche.  We don’t know if this is a slam-dunk, but it’s the most reasonable position to take when you are a smaller competitor. Particularly, with the fast paced nature of today’s society that gets its information on mobile devices.”


Founded in 2002, Core Edge Image & Charisma Institute is a research and development company that focuses on helping individuals build influence and power within organizations.


For more information on Core Edge Private Label Rights, visit: http://plr.coreedgeprivatelabelrights.com or call: (678) 698-3386

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Wednesday, October 1, 2014

3 Lessons Police Supervisors Can Learn from Kojak’s Charisma



Edward Brown, M.S.

If you can remember the police TV show “Kojak,” starring Telly Savalas, that says two things about you. One, you have been around for a while. And two, you have accumulated a great deal of experience, personally and professionally.   But, for those who may not know, who and what Kojak was, here’s a brief history lesson. “Kojak” aired 1973-1978 and captured the imagination of the nation because the character was the ultimate Alpha male with an understated compassion for the underdog.  Kojak represented the uber  male that was characterized in the 1970s. This was the era of Charles Bronson, Clint Eastwood and Jim Brown. These testosterone filled characters celebrated the strength and bravado of manhood at that time.  Of course, these characters were flawed, but loved, because despite the circumstance, you always knew where they stood and where the line was drawn.

Kojak exhibited a type of charisma by which  police supervisors could benefit. Three lessons police supervisors can learn from Kojak’s charisma are:

Cultivate a commanding presence. Lieutenant Theodore (“Theo”) Kojak was always nattily dressed with a complimentary fedora to accentuate his attire. When he said “Who loves ya baby,” or called Detective Bobby Crocker (“Crockaaaa”), it was always with a sense of purpose for achieving a specific goal.  Kojak didn’t mince words and everyone knew that his communication stemmed from deeply held beliefs that were formulated long before he joined the New York City Police Department.  Kojak created a family of detectives, where it was clear that he was in control, but the love and respect he had for his men wasn’t necessarily stated, but understood.   Consequently, his detectives modeled the excellence reflected within Kojak’s leadership style.

Adapt to any environment. Kojak exhibited a self-confidence that was reflected within his interactions with diverse communities. A great deal of this self-assurance came from his Greek background.  Telly Savalas’ Greek heritage was emblematic of New York City as a melting pot. It wasn’t only natural for Kojak to feel comfortable among diverse ethnicities, but various political and business circles. This cosmopolitan flair permeated throughout his detective squad, which would make closed-minded attitudes oppositional to that department’s culture.

Demonstrate a high degree of intellect. Kojak was a smart cop. He was a combination of intellectual insight, analysis and wit. It’s easier to buy into a leader whose intelligence you respect.  Also, you can gain employee compliance and loyalty when they respect the critical thinking skills of the leader. Did Kojak have all the answers?  Of course not. The beauty of the show was that it was an ensemble, made up of men who were leaders within their own right.  After serving under Lt. Kojak, those detectives could have led any division within the department.
Kojak may reflect and era that’s bygone, but his leadership qualities are timeless. You may not have the swagger, finesse and charisma of Kojak, but by cultivating a commanding presence, adapting to any environment and demonstrating a high degree of intellect, you can increase employee engagement and productivity within your department.      

Edward Brown, M.S., is a content marketer and researcher for Core Edge Police Pro (a subsidiary of Core Edge Image & Charisma Institute, Inc.), which develops web copy and digital products for law enforcement agencies.

He has advanced legal training from the University of Dayton School of Law and a master’s degree from Mercer University in Public Safety Leadership.



Ed is the author of over 30 books including: Police Leadership: The Morale Driven Police Department and The A-Team: How to Be a Top Police Department in Recruiting, Training and Retaining Employees available at Amazon Kindle.